Founded in 1993
  Year: 1998 | Volume: 6 | Issue: 3 | Pages: 105-107
  Actual Problem
  DETECTION OF HIGH GRADE SQUAMOUS INTRACERVICAL LESION (H-SIL) CHANGES OF THE UTERINE CERVIX IN HEALTH CENTRE
Jadranka RAVIC, Marija TESIC, Tihomir R. VEJNOVIC
  DOI:
  Abstract:
  High grade squamous intraepithelial lesions of the uterine cervix have a high potential of progression into invasive cervical cancer, thus early detection and treatment of these lesions are of crucial importance for eradication of this disease. This can be achieved by colposcopical and cytological examination of the uterine cervix. The aim of the study was to determine the correlation of cytologic and colposcopic findings with histologic results in early detection of H-SIL changes of the uterine cervix. Eighty cases with H-SIL changes detected from 1993-1997 were analyzed in our Advisory service. The average age of the patients was 36.06 (range age: 22-61). The highest number of the patients belonged to 25-45 age group. Cytologic findings were Pap III in 60.00% of the patients, whereas 11.25% of the examined women had Pap IV. Pathologic colposcopic findings were obtained in 86.25% of the patients. The above results suggest that none of the applied methods can, with absolute certainty, diagnose H-SIL changes of the uterine cervix, but both methods, used complementally, are very suitable for early detection of premalignant changes of the cervix.
  Key words: CERVIX NEOPLASMS+diagnosis; COLPOSCOPY; CERVICAL INTRAEPITHELIAL NEOPLASIA+diagnosis; CYTODIAGNOSIS
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Founder, owner and publisher: Oncology Institute of Vojvodina, Serbia
Online since 1997 (Abstracts only); 2000 (Abstracts and Full text)
ISSN: 0354-7310 eISSN: 1450-9520